The Enthusiasts' Page

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All things 'Maserati'. News of forthcoming models, owner's cars, tips, 'Marque' reunions and the odd touch of humour! In fact anything of interest to the 'Maseratista'.

So if you have any news about Maseratis or have anything owners and enthusiasts should know, send details to maserati123@btopenworld.com


Trident on the rocker cover of Maserati Tipo 6CM
 
You can click on some pictures for a better view!!
 
 
 
From Jacques in France

 

Jacques' Ghibli Spyder continues to progress
 
 
 
 
From Maciek in Poland

"Although my Maserati is not fully ready, it is now roadworthy!

See a few pictures and enjoy with us the rebirth of this wonderful car!

Regards,

Maciek."

 

Two Beauties - My wife and the Maserati!
 

The finished dashboard

My Maserati 3500GT - not quite finished but roadworthy!
 

A classic line with a racing pedigree!

The beauty is in its simplicity of design!
 
 
 
 
From Rolf in Sweden

"Hello!

It's very interesting reading your pages. I have an Maserati 4900 from 1973 America.

The car is in excellent condition having been carefully restored. It have some exceptions to the specification you have at your pages. The tyres are different, the same size as the Ghibli and Khamsin. The manual gear shift pattern is also different, gear no 1 is down, no 2 is up and so on. I do have the brakes from Citroen that have to be repaired every year, hopeless.

Besides that the rest of the car has good quality.

Best regards,

Rolf.

PS: This is my Indy at a Maserati event in Sweden/Stockholm where I live.

 

My Indy at a Maserati event in Stockholm
 
 
 
 
From Nikos in Greece

"Dear Enrico,

Here are two photos of my Maserati 2.24v (1990-1991 without catalyst).

Best regards,

Nikos."

 

Nikos with his Maserati 2.24v

 
 
 
 
 
From Gert in Belgium

1974 Maserati Medici show car

One-off show car was commisioned by an American customer from top designer Giorgio Giugiaro's Ital-Design studios and exhibited at the 1974 Turin show. It was Giugiaro's concept of a modern ceremonial car, and was called "Medici" after the famous Florentine banking family and patrons of the arts.

A novel feature of this luxury hatchback is the steel-framed transparent roof panelling. The first version had retractible headlamps. In 1975 it was shown in Los Angeles modified by Ital-Design as a longer six-seater version with a fitted bar and the four rear passengers sitting facing one another. This definitive form of the Medici car was shown at the 1976 Paris Motor Show, and is then said to have been sold to the Shah of Persia.

V8 cylinder - 4930cc - 320 bhp - 280 km/h (175 mph)

Louwman Collection - www.louwmancollection.nl

 

The Maserati Medici
 

The Medici - view obstructed by a motorcycle

The Medici - view obstructed by a De Lorean!
 
 
 
 
From Modena in Italy

Whilst visiting the Candini Workshop in Modena, I stumbled across three interesting Biturbos; an ealrly series one Biturbo, a Biturbo S and a 222.

Fortunately for me they were two excellent examples maintained in pristine condition that in Italy would be described as being 'd'amatore' (belonging to a lover - a lover of Maseratis that is!).

 

The Biturbo S

 
 

 

 
 

Two NACA vents on the bonnet

The NACA vent
 

Biturbo S

The dummy petrol flap on the driver's side (LHD)
 

The leather and suede interior

 
 

 

The rectangular instrument binnacle of the early Biturb
 

 

 
 

Only the Biturbo S plemun chamber...

...was finished in a light grey stove enamel
 

One of the two intercoolers

Biturbo S plemun chamber
 

Note how the windscreen and rear window finishing strips...

...underlap each other at one end...
 

... and overerlap at the other!

 
 

The best looking radiator grille of the Biturbo era cars!

Mille Miglia wheels with the centre finished in dark grey
 
 
 

The Biturbo 1a serie engine bay

Note the aluminium plenum chamber
 

The Biturbo air filter box only had one intake hose

The aluminium plenum chamber
 
 
 
 
The changing Trident

Maserati's legendary trident logo has undergone many changes since that early classic trident design by Mario Maserati. Although the trident image has remained, various designers ahve put their own interpretation on it. During the Biturbo era, an extra trident was sited on the fuel filler flap and even that trident was played around with!

 

The trident on the Biturbo 1a serie
 

The trident on the 222

The trident on the Shamal
 
 
 
 
Where's that starter motor?

Ever wondered where the starter motor is situated on a Biturbo. The engine of this Biturbo was having a little work done on the cylinder heads, and, with the intake manifold removed, it's easy to spot its location!

 

Note the loose timing belt
 

The starter motor is situated...

...in between the cylinder banks
 

A special Maserati tool...

...keeps the cylinder chambers in place.
 
 
 
 
Scuderia Ossoduro!!

And what's this all about? Well it was a club set up by Maserati Hardbone drivers who liked to take their cars on the track and drive them the way Maserati intended!

 

Ossoduro - Hardbone Drivers
 
 
 
 
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