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All things 'Maserati'. News of forthcoming models, owner's cars, tips, 'Marque' reunions and the odd touch of humour! In fact anything of interest to the 'Maseratista'.

So if you have any news about Maseratis or have anything owners and enthusiasts should know, send details to enricomaserati@btinternet.com


Virtual Maserati clock by toolshell.org
 
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YOU ARE NOW ON PAGE 179
 
 
 
 
From Newspress in the UK
 

THE NEW MASERATI GRANCABRIO TO PREMIERE IN FRANKFURT

 

The Maserati GranCabrio, the first four-seater convertible in the Trident carmakerís history, will make its world wide debut on September 15 at the upcoming Frankfurt Motor Show. The introduction of the GranCabrio Ė the Tridentís third prong Ė completes Maseratiís product line-up that now consists of three different families of models: Quattroporte, GranTurismo, GranCabrio.

The GranCabrio represents the very essence of Maserati in terms of open-top cars. Itís a Maserati in the purest sense of the word: from the unmistakable style by Pininfarina to the spacious interior, from the craftsmanship of each detail to the driving pleasure and performance. The Maserati GranCabrio enriches all five senses in a shared open-air experience, without sacrificing comfort and performance. A dream car designed and built for men and women who love to live life in an understated Ė though sophisticated Ė manner. Like all the made in Maserati open-top convertibles: special cars aimed at refined connoisseurs.

In fact the GranCabrio is continuing the Maserati tradition in open-top cars, joining models that have played such an important part in the Modena carmakerís history such as the 1950 A6G Frua Spyder, 1960 3500GT Vignale Spyder, 1964 Mistral Spyder, 1968 Ghibli Spyder and 2001 Spyder designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro, the car that marked Maseratiís return to the United States. In the footsteps of tradition, the GranCabrio opens a new chapter, because never before have four-seater top-down models ever been produced at the Viale Ciro Menotti Maserati factory. Four proper seats, so that the rear passengers are not merely supporting actors, but co-stars of the journey.

The GranCabrio is powered by a 4.7 litre V8, 323 kW engine and is the convertible with the longest wheelbase on the market. The GranCabrioís roof is strictly canvas-made, emphasizing the link with the Maserati tradition.

The Maserati GranCabrio will be marketed starting next winter, and experienced by customers the world over from the following spring.

 

The Maserati GranCabrio

 
 

The Maserati GranCabrio

 
 

The Maserati GranCabrio

 
 

The Maserati GranCabrio

 
 

Text and photos courtesy of Maserati Media Center

 
 
 
 
 
From Saulius in Lithuania
 

"Hi Enrico,

Here is some more photos about Biturbo body and Ghibli spirit; engine, gearbox (6-speed), reducer, rear axle, etc.

Regards,

Saulius."

 

Maserati Biturbo S

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

The Biturbo S with the "Ghibli spirit!"

 
 
 
 
 
 
From Nuno in Portugal
 

"Hi Enrico,

I think exist one more, but a "normal" version. If I have more information, I send to you.

I have some photos of Maseratis in Portugal and Circuito da Boavista Ferrari/Maserati Event. One "actual" photo of Ghibli GT too.

If you need them for you site, please use.

- Maserati 3200 GT Assetto Corsa 2001
- Ex-Jean Todt Maserati Quattroporte 2003
- Maserati Ghibli GT 1995
- Maserati 420 1987

Anything else, tell me.

Best Regards,

Nuno."

 

Maserati 420

Maserati Ghibli GT
 

The ex-Jean Todt Maserati Quattroporte

Maserati 3200 GT assetto corsa
 

Maseratis and Ferraris

Maseratis and Ferraris at the Circuito da Boavista
 

Maseratis and Ferraris at the Circuito da Boavista

Quattroporte seicilindri
 
 
 
 
 
From Paul in the USA
 

PEBBLE BEACH and LAGUNA SECA

 

"Hello again,

It's Peter Martin's son Paul.

I just drove my C Type up to Monterey for the Pebble Beach Tour and the Laguna Seca Historics.

I saw and drove with some spectacular cars, I thought your readers would enjoy these photos from some of last weeks events.

Cheers,

Paul."

 

Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa

Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa
 

Ferrari 250 GT Lusso

Bizzarrini 5300 GT Strada
 

Jaguar C Type

 
 

Shelby AC 427 Cobra

AC Aceca-Bristol
 

Ferrari 250 TR59/60

 
 

Lotus Eleven

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

Maserati Tipo 4CL
 

Maserati Tipo 4CL

Maserati Tipo 4CL
 

Maserati Tipo 4CL

Maserati Tipo 4CL
 

Maserati A6GCS

Maserati A6GCS
 

Maserati Tipo 61

Maserati Tipo 61
 

Maserati Tipo 61

Maserati Tipo 61
 

Austi Healey 100S

 
 

The Racing Jaguars

 
 

Jaguar D-Type

Jaguar D-Type
 

Jaguar D-Type

Jaguar C-Type
 

Jaguar C-Type

Jaguar C-Type
 

Cockpit of Jaguar D-Type

Cockpit of Jaguar D-Type
 

Cockpit of Jaguar D-Type

Cockpit of Jaguar D-Type
 

Cockpit of Jaguar C-Type

Cockpit of Jaguar C-Type
 

Cockpit of Jaguar C-Type #21

Cockpit of Jaguar C-Type #21
 

Morgan JAP Super Aero

 
 

 

1950 Allard J2
 

Alfa Romeo Volpi Special

Alfa Romeo Volpi Special
 

Alfa Romeo Volpi Special

Alfa Romeo Volpi Special
 

Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Spyder

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

Alfa Romeo 8C 35

Alfa Romeo 8C 35
 

Alfa Romeo 8C 35

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

Ferrari TR59 Fantuzzi Spyder
 

Ferrari 250 TR59/60 Fantuzzi Spyder

Mercedes Benz Silver Arrow Streamliner W196R
 

Auto Union Type D (1938)

Auto Union Type D (1938)
 

Auto Union Type D (1938)

 
 

 

Ferrari 250 TR59/60
 

 

AC Ace Bristol Zagato Coupe
 

Bugatti Type 51 Dubos Coupe

 
 
 
 
 
 
From Sander in The Netherlands
 

"Hi Enrico,

I have done a lot of reading on your website, the technical assistance part for Ghibli IIs. My name is Sander from the Netherlands. I recently purchased a 1996 Ghibli 2.8 Auto, unfortunately on my way home I blew a head gasket.

I am not a Maserati specialist, but have some skills in mechanics. At the moment I am trying to replace them (together with the water pump, belts, spark plugs, etc.). Right now I am running into some difficulties and would really appreciate it if you could give some help with the following:

1. I heard that is should be possible to remove both cylinder heads without removing the engine from the car. The left bank (from driver's position) will need clearance from the brake booster. So I removed the four screws above the pedals inside the car, but there is no room to remove the brake booster. Any ideas on this? Maybe push the engine aside and then the brake booster can go aside, or should I loosen one engine mount?

2. How do I remove the belt tensioner, or at least take the tension off?

3. Should I always replace the cam chains and tensioner as well?

4. Are there maybe other points I will have to keep in mind, like maybe have the camshafts fixed before disconnecting (I marked everything by the way).

I saw my Ghibli a couple of months ago for sale at a car showroom near London at GB £6,000. Compared to the prices in The Netherlands this was a bit cheaper. The advert said the car had a full service history and was in top shape. Unfortunately the truth was a bit different; the car didn't have a full service history; from 2,000 miles on there were only a few handwritten leaflets.

I already made a lot of expenses to get there and had planned to drive back. So there wasn't really an alternative. So I paid the seller the money (something like GB £5,700 in the end if I remember correctly) and began with my drive home.

On my way home I found out that the air/con didn't blow cold (although they told me it worked fine). Then in The Netherlands I found out that the car was using coolant. And finally, when I drove it home from our DVLA (called RDW) it almost did not start and the engine was running badly due to a leaking head gasket (I hope it's not the cylinder head itself).

When I contacted the company about it they didn't really bother, although I am 90% sure they knew it was using coolant. I have a broken headlight (driver's side), not sure if this was already there or if it happened on my way home, but I have since found out that it's about the most expensive part on a Ghibli.

All in all, pretty bad experience with that company and I wouldn't advice anybody to buy from there.

Because I have studied automotive engineering and worked for some years in several garages, I decided to do the work myself. I worked at a Maserati dealership so I ordered the parts (too bad without a discount). With these cars you really depend on the help from others, because I for sure, don't have all the knowledge it takes.

I can't say everything is going smoothly. A Maserati isn't a VW or BMW of course, so some bolts can't be reached, some parts are located well hidden or other stuff like that.

When the car was running good it did have a lot of power, shifted smooth (it's an automatic) and of course it looked great (cream leather interiour is full of Italian class). I noticed the intake ports were machined. The thin wall between the two ports for one cylinder was even razor sharp, can't believe this is standard on these cars (also attached a picture of this).

The interior is in very good shape. There is no structural rust or anything, just some rust bubbles. My turbo pressure gauge isn't working and I believe it has Quattroporte IV wheels (I think it doesn't look too bad).

So I am excited to get it back one the road again but it is a lot of work. I don't have a workshop or professional tools, just basic tools and I do the work under a car port.

I am planning to set up my own business importing and selling special cars next year. I bought four cars in total now in the UK (BMW E30 320iS, BMW E34 M5 Touring, Mercedes 2.3 16V Cosworth and the Maserati). I am thinking about keeping the Ghibli for myself, but at 25 years of age it is rather expensive to drive.

I attached some further pictures. If I am correct this should be a hydraulic one? But which bolt do I have to loosen in order to get the tension off?

What do you think about the intake ports, are they machined or something?

I also made a picture of my working space. It shows the limited possibilities to get the engine out. I will try and see if I can loosen the engine mounts. I am always very cautious so I will only proceed when it's not dangerous.

What do you think about the intake porsts, are they machined or something?

I am happy to answer any questions and of course would appreciate all help. If somebody has any advice concerning my plans for the car import business or knowns a interesting left-hand drive car for sale, I would also really appreciate any help.

Thanks,

Sander."

 

The Ghibli in the showroom near London

During the journey the Ghibli takes in some fresh air
 

Back in The Netherlands along with ...

... Sander's collection of imported cars
 

The Ghibli in Sander's carport come workshop

 
 

The razor-sharp thin wall between the two ports!

 
 

The Hydraulic timing belt tensioner
 

 

 
 

 
 
 
 
 

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